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Goa Resorts tagged as - Cola beach Goa

Showing 2 Beach Hut Resorts in Goa
Blue Lagoon

Blue Lagoon

Cottage & Bungalow, Cola BeachBlue Lagoon is an exclusive beach resort on beautiful and unspoiled Cola beach in south Goa. Surround by incredible nature, a backdrop of jungle filled palm trees and overlooking a freshwater blue lagoon and Cola beach; Blue Lagoon Beach Resort is the perfect place for a secluded romantic getaway or to experience a lost Goa paradise, newly discovered with family and friends. Blue Lagoon Resort, Cola beach in south Goa offers various types of accommodations from Luxury Beachfront Cottages, to Raj....

21968 Visits

Soneca Beach Resort

Soneca Beach Resort

Cottage & Bungalow, Cola BeachSoneca Beach Resort is located on Cola beach, approximately 5km to the north of Agonda beach and it is considered one of Goa’s last lost paradises. This exclusive tented beachfront resort with its own private cove on Cola beach is encircled by a forest of coconut trees and it is the perfect place for a quiet and secluded Goa beach holiday. . Soneca beach resort in Goa offers 14 hand crafted Rajasthani style tents, all tastefully designed with antique wood furniture and equipped with twin beds,....

12795 Visits

Related Articles

Agonda vs. Palolem Beach

or What is the best beach in south Goa

If it happens and you arrive to South Goa, there is one character trait of yours that it is important to determine: Are you a Palolem beach person, or an Agonda beach kinda guy (or gal)?

The test is a simple one. You just have to ask yourself – do you feel more comfortable in a secluded, out of the way, community, or are you a person of the big - rushing, keep on changing, always busy – city.

Palolem Beach Party or Yoga in Agonda

Agonda Beach huts or Agonda Beach Resorts

If you chose the first option as the one that suits you better, you surely are an Agonda beach person.

Agonda Beach

Agonda beach Goa used to be a getaway beach from the center of happening – Palolem beach and its area. There were almost no beach huts in Agonda, but merely very few small guesthouses, that were mostly occupied by loners, that were seeking to enjoy the beautiful beaches of south Goa, but were also looking for some peace and quiet, that were not always so easy to find on Palolem beach.

Agonda Restaurants

Eating used to be simple – mainly local 'dhaba's, with south Goan food, and maybe one or two restaurants that their menus answered, somehow, to the definition of continental food.
Nowadays, Agonda beach is transformed quite dramatically. But in a good way. The season on Agonda beach is still short - when compared to what happens in Palolem - and it starts sometimes in mid November, and lasts only until beginning of April. The beach is still the same magnificent beach, very wide and long stretch, where you can always find many adorable spots, where the feeling is that the beach belongs only to you. So what has changed? The most obvious change are the beach huts that all of a sudden started appearing, without interfering with the general view of the beach. More beach huts means more people, but Agonda is actually large enough to give everyone the sense of semi-solitude they are looking for. Another interesting change is the food. Together with the beach huts (and other types of guesthouses), the food and restaurant scene also grew quite remarkably. There are very good restaurants that serve very good continental and other genres of food, beside the local south Goan one. Now, all of those loners, can also enjoy a good satisfying meal, without having to go all the way to Palolem.

Goa Resorts in Agonda Beach

The main road in Agonda has become a cheerful road planted with shops on both sides - not as big and loaded as in Palolem, but intimate and calm.

To conclude, Agonda now has it all – tranquility, solitude and the charm of a fishermen village, together with amenities and the ability to satisfy those simple everyday needs.

GOA INDIA

 

 

Travel to Goa India

Goa is India’s smallest state, with beaches that have been voted amongst the best in Asia. A lone Portuguese outpost for more than 450 years, Goa was only reclaimed by India in the 1960s - and the colonial influence is everywhere. Gorgeous (often crumbling) architecture, fusion cuisine and afternoon siestas make Goa India unlike any other part of India. However, the deservedly famous beaches, warm blue seas and magical sunsets over the Arabian Ocean are the main draw for visitors to Golden Goa.

Beach holiday in Goa

More than two million tourists flock to this beautiful 100km slice of the Indian coastline every year. Whether to enjoy water sports and swimming in the sparkling blue sea, take a boat trip to spot dolphins, or just relax on a sun bed with a good book, Goa is a premier beach holiday destination. Cool off with some fresh tropical fruit juices or an ice cold Indian beer, have a relaxing massage or join one of the many Goa yoga classes.

Nightlife continues in this relaxed vibe, with most people happy to slurp some sunset cocktails at one of the many beach shacks and enjoy an evening meal of freshly caught seafood at a table under the stars, near any Goa resort. If you’re looking for some entertainment though, check out WhatsUpGoa for listings of everything from live music and bands, to club nights, casinos and festivals.

Most beaches in Goa India will have a local town with banks, ATMs, travel agents, and shops selling everyday essentials, whilst beach sellers peddle sarongs and offer pedicures and henna tattoos. Serious souvenir shoppers should head to the weekly flea and night markets in north Goa, to haggle for anything from saffron and silver jewellery to sandals and sunglasses.

Holiday off the beach in Goa

Whilst famous for its beautiful coastline, Goa offers many more attractions to those willing to venture off the beach.

Nature in Goa

The extraordinary and abundant nature of Goa India is clear to see everywhere from the swaying coconut palms to the ubiquitous cows on the beach, but many people do not realise they are visiting one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. Lush mountain ranges with dense green jungle and hidden waterfalls, and beautiful rivers and backwaters are all open to explore. Bird spotters will marvel at the regular sightings of kingfishers, sea eagles and kites, whilst on a trip to one of Goa’s Wildlife Sanctuaries you may encounter troops of monkeys or even an elusive leopard. Life also continues unchanged at many inland villages, with buffalo ploughing the paddy fields and local women drying spices in the sun.

History in Goa

Architecture and history buffs will also find that Goa has much to offer. From the UNESCO World Heritage cathedrals and convents found in the abandoned 16th century capital Old Goa, to the living and breathing colonial Latin Quarter in Panjim, Goa’s current first city.

The Lunch Club by KOKOindia offers a unique cultural experience ‘beyond the beach’, with a private tour of one of Goa’s grand mansions, and an authentic Indo-Portuguese lunch in a restored Palacio.

The Portuguese policy of destruction resulted in some of the present day Goan temples being unique in India, with domed roofs and white towers borrowing from both Muslim and Christian architecture. One of the most important is the beautiful Shri Mangeshi Temple, dedicated to Lord Shiva, whose deity was kept hidden during occupation until the temple could be rebuilt.

The Hindu temples poking out from the coconut palms alongside the white churches therefore becomes a great visual metaphor for Goa’s special heritage.

Goa Airport

Travelling to Goa

By plane

Goa Airport or Goa Dabolim airport, where both international charter and domestic flights land, is in the centre of the state, making even the most remote beaches less than two hours drive away. Many international scheduled flights land in Mumbai, an hour’s flight from Goa. Anyway, it is always good to have someone pre-arranged to pick you up in time and drop you directly in your resort in Goa.

By train

The Konkan train line has stations dotted along the length of Goa, although many faster trains only call at Margao (Madgaon) station, in the south. India’s trains are a cheap way of covering long distances in relative comfort, whilst experiencing the changing landscape outside the window. The network covers the whole country, if you plan on extending your Goa trip with a visit to the Kerala backwaters or the Palaces of Rajasthan.

By bus

Buses connect Goa to all the major cities, such as Mumbai, Delhi and Bangalore, as well as to popular destinations for a trip from Goa, or Goa airport including Hampi and Gokarna. Just be prepared for the bumpy roads!

Getting around Goa

Your mode of travel once you arrive in Goa will depend on the distance to be covered and how much time you have. For short local journeys, hiring a bicycle or scooter or jumping in the back of a rickshaw are the best option, whereas for longer distances you can brave the local buses or arrange for a car and driver for the day.

 

 

Goa Cuisine – Food, Dining and Restaurants in Goa

Goa is a food lover's paradise, offering a taste tour of Indian cuisine, alongside local specialities, fantastic fresh seafood and tropical fruits, as well as international food options to suit the palates of its two million visitors.

Goan Food

The food in Goa, as with anywhere in the world, is influenced by location and climate. This small coastal state relies heavily on fishing, so seafood is a major part of the diet. The land is planted with coconut palms and rice paddies, and so coconut (oil, milk, cream and alcohol) is an important ingredient in Goa recipes, and rice is the staple food. Various spices are used to give the food its intense flavours.

However, what makes Goan food so distinctive is that it is also heavily influenced by history. 450 years of colonization resulted in Goan cooking absorbing a strong Portuguese flavour. Local seafood, coconut, and tangy kokum were combined with palm vinegar (unknown elsewhere in India), chillies and cashew nuts (introduced by the Portuguese) and meats, especially pork, to produce one of the world’s original fusion foods.

To this day, Goan ‘fish curry rice’ - freshly caught fish, such as mackerel, in a hot and sour coconut gravy - is a daily meal.

Traditional Goan Dishes

Unlike much of Indian cuisine, Goan cooking uses a lot of meat and fish. Goan Catholics in particular have been heavily influenced by their Portuguese heritage, with famous fusion dishes including vindaloo, traditionally prepared with pork and vinegar, spicy chouriço sausages, and chicken xacuti with chillies and coconut milk - all dishes whose names and ingredients have their origins in Portuguese cuisine, but with a Goan twist. Mol De Peixe (fish pickle) and Balchao (prawn pickle) are popular accompaniments.

The catch of the day may include kingfish, pomfret, shark and mackerel, with seafood including crabs, prawns, oysters and squid. Seafood can be cooked in sour and spicy sauces such as ambot tik, or more delicate coconut based masalas, rava fried in semolina flour, or baked in a tandoori clay oven.

And for dessert, the Indo-Portuguese blend is again evident in Goa’s most famous pudding bebinca, a rich, layered egg custard with coconut.

Goa Street Food and Dhabas

If you’re hungry but don’t want a full meal, are on a tight budget, or just want to explore eating like a local, then a local dhaba or street food cart is the perfect food pit stop.

Street food carts can be found in most towns in the evening, serving anything from chouriço sandwiches to deep fried chillies. In India’s only beef loving state, beef Chamuças (a type of samosa) and beef croquettes are also a common sight.

Another firm favourite is the Raos Omelette, dipped in a spicy coconut-based gravy and garnished with lime and onions.

And every Goan village will have a dhaba serving chai and bhaji-pao - a pea and potato curry with local bread - for breakfast.

Dining and Restaurants in Goa resorts

While it’s worth seeking out some authentic Goan food whilst on holiday, restaurants in Goa cater to all tastes and palates - from budget south Indian Udupis dishing up vegetarian classics such as masala dosa to high-end establishments serving gourmet mediterranean food. However, most of the time you will probably eat at local beach shacks, or your beach resorts in-house restaurants, offering fresh fruit smoothies, snacks, Indian curries, and fresh seafood on the bbq.

And if you crave a taste of home, whether that’s Tel Aviv, London or Berlin, then a number of expat run cafes can satisfy your craving for hummus, fish & chips or just a really good cup of coffee.

Drinks in Goa

Goa’s popularity as a holiday destination is boosted by having the lowest rates of tax on domestic alcohol in India, from famous Kingfisher beer and Old Monk rum to a wide range of wines and spirits.

Goan Porto, a sweeter less refined version of its Portuguese namesake, can be found everywhere, alongside feni, the local speciality made from cashew nuts or coconuts. Every bar will have its distinctive own feni, whether double distilled or flavoured with spices, but beware - it’s an acquired taste and extremely potent!

For non-alcoholic refreshment, popular local drinks include Badam, an almond milk, or sweet yoghurt lassi, as well as the ubiquitous chai and fresh coconut water.

But on the beaches you’ll find a wide range of refreshing drinks, including lots of tropical fruit juices, and imported alcohol alongside the local alternatives. So why not invent your own cocktail and continue Goa’s rich history of flavour fusion!

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